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Inside Base and Superstructure, an interview with Zsa Zsa Sapien & Tingle Lungfish.

Words by Jed Morgans


Forever settled as the heart of South London's political gritty-art-music culture, Brixton's Meatraffle shares their third studio album, 'Base and Superstructure'.


Watch below the Lou Smith-produced interview, where Meatraffle's Zsa Zsa Sapien and Tingle Lungfish discuss their Street Names, Meatraffle’s new album Base and Superstructure, Bon Jovi, perm problems, Pat Jennings and much, much more!



'Base and Superstructure' Track by Track:

- Zsa Zsa Sapien


Lovesong Industrial Complex: "Whether you are waiting on the phone to make an appointment with your GP, taking your car in for an MOT, trying on clothes in TKMaxx, shoplifting in Tesco's, drinking in a bar with poor quality HIFI, mixing up plaster for spreaders, on the roof replacing old cast iron guttering, you will hear music and lyrics just about love, not filling in your tax returns, just love and it is as addictive as sugar and a hugely profitable business for the Lovesong Industrial Complex."


Posh People in Pop: “Is about Bryan Ferry who my Mum adored in the 70s and 80s but as a child you know you get very jealous of your mum liking someone more than your Dad, so I developed this disease called Ferryphobia and I am still suffering from it to this day. But the song got expanded to other posh people in pop of which there are too many to mention.”



Mannaggia La Miseria: “Is Italian for something like “Blast the misery!’, but it also has the power of "Fuck!" in English, so we made it into a powerful critique of competition and capitalism on planet Earth with its endless wars and overconsumption.”


Street Names Pt.1 & 2: “Street Names is about being arrested by the cops and being asked what your name is and you tell them "Tingle Lungfish" but they don't believe you.”


New Maps of Hell: “Was written about me caddying for my cousin and uncle at Selsdon Park Golf Club, who they thought were in paradise. My Uncle was a nice man but was flawed by being a rags-to-riches Thatcherite and voting Tory. I was a nascent Communist at the time and they made me dress up in Pringle and Ashworth, I looked like a Heavy Metal Forrest Gump and I thought I had landed in Hell, the clubhouse afterwards was like the furnace department in Hades.”


Credit: Lou Smith


Robots: “How the internet can hone in on people's insecurities in matters of financial or emotional troubles, it's about scams, it's about being caught out and your trust in humanity goes down the drain.”


Bully Boss: “Is about Capitalist con tricks to make employees believe they work for a loving company, that they have your best interests at heart, they have the cocktail bar nights paid for by the company, all the socials, the office parties, having a laugh, getting drunk and photocopying your arse, the boss is always the worst dancer and always pays the tab but next morning will be checking your work rates and targets.”


Power Shower: “Is about you being the greatest vocalist in the world for a very short moment during your shower, both you as performer and the audience are as one, helped along with the resonating frequency of the room, "when you hit a low note the room resonates" you are supplied with a plethora of earworms in your brain and your water mic is the industry standard Shure SM58.”


Lambeth Walk: “During lockdown we developed ingenious ways of fighting depression like lino cutting and baking good bread, home brewing and long walks. The capitalist machine ground to a halt and we were given the wealth of time, in a strange way humanity came to life despite the awful death toll and heartbreaking stories of lost and isolated loved ones in moribund states and with a "swinging brick for a heart" Conservative government at the helm, it was a truly dark period in our lives. This song was recorded in isolation and separation.”


Smallest Gang: “Is loosely based around Tim Roth’s character and his "Honey Bunny" wife in Pulp Fiction and explores the romanticism of petty crime.”


 

Catch Meatraffle live at The Windmill (Friday 29th) and at The George Tavern (Saturday 30th)



Listen and Purchase Base and Superstructure





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